In the past few days, Sir Alex Ferguson has laughed off the idea of spending a ridiculous sum of money on Kaka, claiming there’s no way United would pull a City in the transfer market.

However, the Kaka rumours have kept coming thick and fast, with AC Milan claiming they would not stand in the way of their star player leaving if that’s what he wanted.

Now we have been heavily linked with Bayern Munich’s Franck Ribery, who joined the German team two years ago for over £20 million.

The current German Player of the Year is desperate to play Champions League football again next year, which until recently looked in doubt with Bayern’s form, but with just five points between the top five teams, anything could happen.

Barcelona have been linked with a £30 million move for him recently, whilst today, United have supposedly tabled a £63 million bid for the player.

Really? No, really?

United have moved to distance themselves from the transfer talk, which appeared in The Guardian this morning.

Now whilst Ribery and Kaka are both quality players and of course I’d welcome either in to the United squad, surely this type of transfer talk can’t be taken seriously. Even with the transfer money from Ronaldo, if he is to go to Spain this summer, surely the club wouldn’t even consider spending such a ridiculous sum of money on a player.

When City put the bid in for Kaka in January, Ferguson was amazed.

“I find it hard to get my head round to be honest. It is amazing,” said Ferguson. “From time to time you get shocks and surprises and this is surprising everyone.”

So why on earth do these stories keep circulating? Could their be an element of truth to them? Or are the press really as barking as they seem?




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